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Now more than ever, it is important to practice excellent hygiene to avoid both COVID-19 and other bugs. Many patients have concerns about their dentist’s cleanliness and sterilization procedures, which are amplified during the COVID-19 outbreak. First and foremost, rest assured that dentists get infection control training in school and have always been required to follow the Centers For Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration recommendations. This is where a dental sterilizer machine and other disinfection protocols come into place.

As you practice social distancing, frequent hand washing, and other precautions, all dental professionals ensure that their whole clinic, including their tools and equipment, stays in excellent shape for their patients. And right now, they’re going above and beyond to reduce your danger of becoming infected with deadly germs and viruses to the greatest extent feasible! Here are some ways dentists make sure that tools, surfaces, and equipment are disinfected, sanitized, and cleaned to keep you and your family safe at every visit.

 

 

Hospital-Grade Disinfectant and Protective Covers

In treatment rooms, surfaces and equipment that dental professionals come into contact with during treatments are covered with disposable plastic barriers and disinfected with hospital-grade disinfectant. Examples are light switches, dental chairs, counters, doorknobs, keyboards, and other items. Regardless of whether a patient is suspected of having an infection or not, these surfaces are cleaned between each patient.

Single-Use Items

When feasible, dentists employ disposable, single-use instruments and materials. Suction tips, polishing cups, plastic covers and barriers, cotton rolls, patient napkins, gloves, syringe needles, anesthetic cartridges, and other items. These materials are then securely disposed of following specified standards after each session.

Instrument Sterilization

Metal tools, mouth mirrors, forceps, and other objects that aren’t single-use are cleaned and sterilized in many processes. And we are not talking about just one dental equipment. Sterilisation of dental instruments requires more than just a dental autoclave. First, they go through a cycle in an ultrasonic cleaner filled with disinfecting solution. Ultrasonic cleaners’ key features include clearing any dirt from porous loads and surgical instruments. This machine works nearly like a “dishwasher.” The tools are then completely washed before being sterilized in a Class B autoclave. This includes porous materials, products in pouches (unwrapped instruments are unacceptable), textiles and hollow items such as wands, turbines, and tips. Dental sterilizers, like dental autoclaves, employ intense dry heat, saturated steam, and pressure. This sterilization process is performed after every use in dental clinics religiously.

dental sterilization procedureThis technique is guaranteed to destroy all viruses and germs since each dental clinic must test its autoclave regularly to verify that it is operating correctly. In the dental industry, these infection control protocols are recommended by the CDC and strictly adhere to by dentists. They’re very effective at preventing any viral or bacterial cross-infection, whether common colds or COVID-19, from spreading, so you can feel confident that taking care of your smile won’t put you at risk! This is also how a dental practice can help reassure others that it is a priority to ensure their safety and patient satisfaction.

Getting your Dental Needs from the Best

If you want to know where your trusted dentist and other dental practices got their dependable autoclaves and other high-quality dental products, consider looking into Critical Dental! We have the ideal machines and instruments fit for your dental practice. Call us today at (02) 8880 7813, so we can give you suggestions if you want the best autoclave for your clinic, or if you want to make sure that your dental office is packed with high-quality instruments and machines.

References:

https://www.osha.gov/coronavirus/control-prevention/dentistry

https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/infectioncontrol/statement-COVID.html

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2405844020322453

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmed.2021.619357/full

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7369766/